My Week in Cult Books

Before I left for vacation, I wrote a book round-up for Refinery29 about cult books. Usually I write these round-ups and say to myself, ‘Wouldn’t it be nice to read one of these books one day?’ But for some reason, with this particular list, I was seized with the urge to actually read them. So I did. For the second half of my trip, I read two books about extreme religion in the United States: Under the Banner of Heaven by Jon Krakauer and Going Clear by Lawrence Wright. One was about Mormonism, the other about Scientology. And both absolutely blew my mind.

Side note: WHY did I avoid nonfiction for so long?! These books were revelations and great beach reads! I kept spewing religion facts to my friends on the beach. I’m sure they loooOooooOoved it (probably not).

Anyhoo, these books both venture into the heart of two American-bred religions. Under the Banner of Heaven looks in the murder of a woman and her infant daughter by her brothers-in-law, who were convinced they were receiving commands from God. From there, Krakauer explains how the history of Mormonism culminated in this one blood-soaked moment. The book is SO well written.

Under the Banner of Heaven is enormous in its sweep – it looks at the formation of Mormonism, how polygamy became a “thing,” what Joseph Smith was talking about when he talked about finding gold in the mountain, the difference between fundamentalist mormons and Mormons. A LOT of Krakauer’s statements are explosive.

But they don’t compare to the Scientology book. Since Scientologists are so litigious maybe I should say that Lawrence Wright was a devious crook for writing this book, and all the pages are falsity-riddled!

^but that is not the case. The book is…well. It’s wild. Each page was more horrifying and enthralling than the next. A religion based on the ravings of a sci-fi writer? A sci-fi writer who essentially let his wife work to death in a Scientology death camp? A religion that has children sign “billion year contracts” and leave their parents so they can work in secretive postings/build Tom Cruise elaborate dwellings? Wright exposes Scientology for the dangerous organization it is, and Tom Cruise for the megalomaniac he is, too. I can’t get over some of the images I read — especially the cruel and unusual punishments Scientology doled out to its Sea Org members.

But what I REALLY can’t get over is how, in both of these books, people are entirely trapped in their beliefs — beliefs that other people might seem strange. Especially the people who are born into these structures. What beliefs have I inherited that might be potentially dangerous? What shapes our reality? What happens when our reality turns out to be the manifestation of someone else’s ravings?

Both of these books are MUST READS. Now I’m off to go find more nonfiction…

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